Thursday, 16 November 2017 17:26

Salvation Army needs help this holiday season to continue serving thousands Featured

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BANGOR - Thanksgiving came early in Bangor when The Salvation Army hosted its annual Thanksgiving community meal. But the organization may need help to keep putting on these types of events.

"It's a community of love," said Phillip Hickey, a volunteer. 

 

And a community is all that some of these people are asking for.

 

"I think it's most important because I think it humbles you and makes you realize what type of things are happening in this world and makes you really want to make things better," said Erika Leonard, a volunteer. 

 

Hickey was homeless 28 years ago. He was addicted to drugs and alcohol. Today, he's married, has a family and is no longer living on the streets.

 

"For me, it's a matter of giving back to what I used to be like," said Hickey. "There's a lot of people that know that."

 

The Salvation Army serves thousands of people from all walks of life.

 

"You can go throughout your day and not see the most vulnerable citizens," said Captain Rebecca Kirk of The Salvation Army of Bangor. "When you come to an event like this, it makes you grateful for what you have and gives services to those in difficult positions."

 

The Red Kettle Campaign is one of the organization's largest fundraisers. It is what helps them put events like these on.

 

"This year, we're in need of raising $155,000, which is a substantial amount of money for a 6-week time period," said Kirk. "It's a real important part to what we're doing."

 

But with major retail stores closing earlier this year, they are encouraging the public to be a bit more intentional.

 

"The loss of Macy's and Kmart means there isn't a place to put our red kettle stand," said Kirk. "Those two locations together raised over $23,000 last year."

 

The Red Kettle Campaign kicked off earlier this month. The bell ringers will soon begin showing up all across the state.

 

"Where we have less kettles out, they (people) might not give as much as they'd normally give without realizing it because they're not thinking, 'oh I didn't pass a kettle,'" said Kirk. "It may seem like a little thing missing those locations but it's a sizable amount of money for us.

 

Jack Hilton

Reporter
jhilton@wvii.com

Jack Hilton joined WVII ABC 7 and WFVX Fox 22 in March of 2016. He was born in Montreal, Canada but was raised in the sunshine state, Fort Lauderdale before graduating cum laude from Husson University with a Bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications.

Born in a famous boxing family, Jack set off toward a different career path, after the mysterious death of his uncle, Arturo Gatti, who is in the Boxing Hall of Fame.

With a heart for people, he is always looking to meet and tell the stories of those in the community. He is charismatic, funny and down to earth.

When not on the air, he enjoys spending time with his lovely wife, his parrots and attending church. He's also a huge fan of TV series such as Buffy, Friends and The Office.

If you have any story ideas or want to talk about tv shows, contact him at jhilton@wvii.com or tweet him @News_JackHilton